Research Matters

Increase funding to solve Europe’s challenges

Innovation for humanity

For over two years now, I have been conducting my thesis as part of the ‹Innovation for Humanity› Alliance, founded by the engineering school INSA and the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Humanity and Inclusion. Since 2017, the NGO has been using 3D-printing to promote access to orthopedic devices in low-income or war context countries. The first outcomes were promising but the reliance on imported filaments from Europe has led to logistical issues while increasing financial and environmental costs. This project aims to recycle plastic waste into 3D-printing filament for local orthopedic device manufacturing. A complete study has been conducted, starting from the selection of suitable materials for printing with adequate mechanical properties. Durability has also been examined through the mechanical characterization of 3D-printed devices on a walking test bench, along with the evaluation of their ageing resistance under tropical environments. Beyond my research work in the laboratory, I had the opportunity to discover the world of humanitarian aid, both at the NGO headquarters and in the field, in Togo. I consider myself very fortunate to have experienced this unique research journey, which is meaningful and rooted in reality.

Responsible researchers:

  • Jérôme CHEVALIER, MATEIS, INSA Lyon, FRANCE
  • Jannick DUCHET-RUMEAU, IMP, INSA Lyon, FRANCE
  • Thomas ELGUEDJ, LAMCOS, INSA Lyon, FRANCE
 

Story by INSA Lyon / Photo: X. Olleros, Handicap International